Children and Technology – Should you be Concerned

father and Son
Why should we be encouraged?
 
 
My philosophy is that technology can also play a role in helping children develop socially and emotionally, when used in balance. Media has helped children care about what is happening on the other side of the world, giving them access to people of different cultures and lifestyles in a click.

Technology is creating common platforms of socialization, exchange of information leading to more understanding and connectedness to the greater whole. Online polls allow teens to participate in social issues. Through blogging, many youths feel they have a voice on different social issues, allowing expression of their perspectives and learning about other people’s perspectives as well. Many are getting involved in online social causes and movements happening worldwide, from saving endangered species to raising money for the homeless.

Video games also offer ways for kids to collaborate, take turns and learn basic principles of teamwork and sharing, while increasing logical thinking, grasping the interrelationship of various inputs and developing motor skills and hand-eye coordination due to movements needed to effectively navigate a mouse or play a video game. New software being designed specifically for classrooms promises to be a remarkable tool for developmental learning and creativity.

Text messaging can also be a developmental tool. Researchers from Coventry University studied 88 children aged between 10 and 12 to understand the impact of text messaging on their language skills. They found that the use of “textisms” could be having a positive impact on reading development and a positive effect on the way children interact with language, rather than harming literacy.

Read more: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/children-and-technology-should-you-be-concerned.html#ixzz2hiiDoeez

 

 

Read More: http://www.care2.com/greenliving/children-and-technology-should-you-be-concerned.html

Choosing After-School Activities

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Activities and College Admission

 

Whatever you choose, don’t overdo it. “What’s happened today is that parenting has become this competitive sport and the trophy is to get your child into a good college,” Newman says. “To that end, children are over-scheduled and they have absolutely no down time. For some children, this works fine, but for the majority, the pressure is intense and they’re exhausted and their academics suffer. In going for the top college prize, parents erroneously think the more activities, the better their child will look on applications, and that’s not what colleges are looking at anymore, if they ever were.”

A single, lasting commitment to one activity is more impressive, she says. And activities that detract from academic performance will end up hurting the child’s chances later on.

Newman particularly warns against over involvement in sports, citing recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics that children take the summer off from a sport and that they not play on two teams in the same sport so as to avoid serious injury.

Over-scheduling can affect your family life, too, so consider the demands on your own time. Keep in mind what will be expected of you when your child begins a new activity. This will include time and transportation, obviously. But it can also mean volunteering, fundraising, and coaching.

One way to let children try out different interests without too much commitment is to enroll them in summer programs. Many of these activities, which can run as short as a week, can be a good way to explore different interests during a time of year that’s free from the pressure of school demands.

Another activity—and one that’s free—is to let your child volunteer at a local agency. Usually, child volunteers must be at least middle school age. Organized volunteer programs can be fun and enlightening for children while helping them develop a commitment to community service.

Read More: http://www.schoolfamily.com/school-family-articles/article/821-choosing-after-school-activities

What Is Your Child’s Learning Style?

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Homework Tips for Each Learning Style

 

Auditory learners are typically good at absorbing information from spoken words. Strategies that work well for auditory learners include:

  • Talking to themselves or with others about what they’re learning
  • Reciting important information aloud, perhaps recording it and playing it back
  • Reading a book and listening to the audio book at the same time
  • Using word associations
  • Setting information to a tune and singing it to help remember it
  • Limiting distracting noises

 

Kinesthetic learners prefer to be active while studying and may not be able to focus while sitting still. Strategies for kinesthetic learners include:

  • Reading aloud and tracking words on a page with a finger
  • Writing things down multiple times to commit them to memory
  • Highlighting and underlining
  • Playing with a stress ball or toy while studying
  • Moving around or taking frequent breaks
  • Doing hands-on activities, such as building models or playing games

 

Visual learners benefit from seeing information on a chalkboard or in an illustration and may grow impatient listening for long periods of time. Strategies for visual learners include:

  • Using flash cards
  • Studying charts, tables, and maps
  • Drawing illustrations
  • Writing things down and reviewing notes
  • Highlighting and underlining
  • Color-coding information

 

 

Read More: http://www.schoolfamily.com/school-family-articles/article/826-what-is-your-childs-learning-style